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May 11, 2001

Three criticisms of the "$30 Billion" privacy price tag
Privacy from Companies
5/11/2001; 8:10:56 PM These are three good criticisms of the amazingly-inflated 30 billion dollar price tag a recent industry "study" placed on the costs of federally mandated privacy.

There's also a lot of pointers in there that apply to analyzing other studies of equal quality.


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May 11, 2001

Anti Spam Bills Continue
Spam & E-Mail5/11/2001; 7:18:40 PM From the article that Slashdot links to:'A bill designed to reduce unsolicited commercial e-mail ran into trouble in a House committee Thursday, as business leaders and lawmakers declared their opposition to the legislation.'Almost every legislator and witness present for the House Judiciary Committee hearing said they had problems with the bill, which previously passed the House Energy and Commerce Committee.'I linked to the Slashdot article for the extremely bad natured humor occurring in the comments... unusually enjoyable.


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May 11, 2001

What They (Don't) Know About You
Privacy from Companies5/11/2001; 6:57:47 PM 'When Richard Smith got his FBI file, he learned a lot of interesting things about himself. 'He found out that he had died in 1976 and that he may have previously been married to a woman named Mary. He also discovered that he may be known as "Ricky Smith" or "Rickie Smith" -- aliases he shares with a couple of convicts doing hard time in Texas. 'En fin, Smith -- who is the chief technology officer of the Privacy Foundation -- found that his FBI file contained more errors than correct data.'


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May 09, 2001

Jury finds Rambus committed fraud
Patents
5/9/2001; 7:35:34 PM 'A federal court jury here Wednesday afternoon found Rambus Inc. had committed fraud by failing to disclose its synchronous patent applications to the industry JEDEC standards body.'

More rare justice.


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May 09, 2001

Truth squad needed to combat Internet lies,commercialization
Misc.5/9/2001; 4:21:46 PM 'When moneyed and powerful interests concoct a prevailing -- but false -- wisdom through public-relations deceptions and other techniques, credible experts need to stand up and explain why this or that emperor is unclothed.''There are precedents. In 1997, for example, federal government officials were publicly mulling whether to force adoption of a ``key escrow'' system of cryptography, whereby people and organizations would effectively be forced to turn over to third parties the keys to their most secret data. Eleven noted technologists, including several of the world's top cyptographers, issued a report persuasively showing why key escrow would inevitably compromise our collective security, not enhance it.''On many topics, one person's truth is another's lie. But every debate needs a foundation of plain facts, laid out in ways the public can grasp.'


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