Permalink
Jan 17, 2001

Online recruiter wins ban on rival's web links
Free Speech
1/17/2001; 11:44:06 PM

'StepStone, the online recruitment company, has obtained an injunction in Germany preventing a rival from linking to its website pages. The move is one of the few cases to test the law on Deep Linking - links between sites that bypass home pages and hence banner advertising....

'"It is not, of course, every case of hypertext linking which is unlawful - the internet would grind to a halt. But the courts in Europe do have power to intervene where linking is extensive and prejudicial to the site involved," Mr Lifely added.

'The injunction, based on new European laws on database and copyright protection, was obtained by StepStone against OFiR, the Danish media group, which owns companies with online recruitment portals in the UK, Germany, Denmark and France.'

 


Permalink
Jan 17, 2001

France Retracts Media Tax Proposal
Country Watch: France
1/17/2001; 11:29:58 PM

A slashdot story, since the media is French. It's good that they backed down, but see the high-ranking comments for some interesting theories


Permalink
Jan 16, 2001

Cache at the End of His Rainbow
General IP Issues1/16/2001; 11:52:24 AM 'Just ask Jake Savin, a San Francisco programmer who recently lost an entire website -- and three years' hard work -- but found a copy of his entire site in Google's online archive. 'It's worth pointing out that it has been questioned whether what Google is doing is legal, or if it is illegal redistribution of content. I want to point out that this could be an instance where we are being blinded to negative consequences because a high-profile good consequence is blocking consideration of the negative ones.Suppose Jake had deliberately deleted the website. Now it's still in Google's cache. Yes, legally, if he demanded that they remove it, they'd have to, but it's obvious that we can't know e
who all is caching our content.I'm not suggesting that these sort of caches are bad, my real opinions are more complicated then that, I just want to point this out as an example of when a small, relatively uncommon good effect can totally obscure much larger questions about other effects. We get this in other places all the time... "it's for the children!" "we tax media because occaisionally somebody might pirate something, so we'll pay off the music companies just in case." The full stories deserves more consideration.Update: A discussion of this on geeknews, later found on dangerousmeta. (Actually, it's not very good; nobody's even mentioned the DMCA, without which you can't understand the legality of the cache.)


Permalink
Jan 16, 2001

Group Says It Beat Music Security but Can't Reveal How
Administrative1/16/2001; 11:43:09 AM 'Edward W. Felten, an associate professor computer science at Princeton , is perhaps best known for his role in the Microsoft antitrust trial. During the trial, where he demonstrated a program that he said stripped the Internet Explorer browser from the Windows operating system, he spent hours explaining what he had done and how he had done it.'But the professor has been far less forthcoming about a more recent hack, and at a conference last week he explained why: Lawyers have advised him that publicizing the details of his tinkering could violate a 1998 federal law called the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.'Academic freedom, or protecting the interests of corporations... that's an easy choice for politician$, isn't it?


Permalink
Jan 16, 2001

France To Tax Computers, Disks, Phones
Country Watch: France
1/16/2001; 11:16:59 AM 'France is planning to slap levies on the sale of computers and digital recording devices to ensure musicians and film-makers are compensated for pirate copying, its Culture Minister said in an interview published on Monday. '

Shocked by the news? I more shocked that people are shocked... I'm actually posting this story because this isn't news. Many other technologies already face similar taxes in the US or elsewhere, and every time you buy or use one of these technologies, you are being presumed guilty of copyright infringement. This battle has already been lost.


<- Future Posts Past Posts ->

 

Site Links

 

RSS
All Posts

 

Blogroll