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Aug 31, 2000

Taking Sides in the Napster War
Music & MP3
8/31/2000; 7:06:31 PM 'Napster and its kin can be viewed as sharing or stealing, as an innocent means of file sharing or an insidious way to infringe on copyright. There are plenty of sites on both sides of the issue.'

My apologies for the delay today... it seems ETP.com is slow for me today.


Permalink
Aug 30, 2000

Court Sets October Trial Date for Napster Case
Music & MP3
8/30/2000; 12:02:31 PM A federal appeals court set the week of Oct. 2 for opening arguments in the trial pitting music song-swap company Napster Inc. against some of the giants of the recording industry.


Permalink
Aug 29, 2000

TRUSTe admits to violating its own privacy policy
Privacy from Companies
8/29/2000; 11:01:06 AM 'TRUSTe, perhaps the Internet's most-recognized nonprofit privacy watchdog organization, learned a jarring lesson on privacy itself, when it downloaded free visitor tracking software from Internet.com's subsidiary Web site TheCounter.com two weeks ago.

'The TRUSTe "trustmark" logo visible on a Web site tells surfers that their personal information is safe because the site follows TRUSTe's code of privacy conduct. While TRUSTe's logo at the top of its own Web page is always in plain view, tracking software discovered by a security expert on TRUSTe's site was invisible to visitors. Use of the tracking software violated TRUSTe's own privacy policy and the policies it certifies 1,000 other Web sites to follow. '


Permalink
Aug 29, 2000

Universal, MP3.com Continue Legal Battle
Music & MP38/29/2000; 10:54:59 AM 'Confounding those who had expected a settlement by now, Universal Music Group took MP3.com (MPPP) back to federal district court in Manhattan on Monday to argue the damages portion of its copyright-infringement case. 'The trial, which is expected to last most of the week, focuses on whether MP3.com "willfully" infringed upon Universal's copyrights when it transferred music on Universal CDs onto its servers for use in its now-suspended My.MP3.com service. If the infringements were not willful, MP3.com would only have to pay Universal somewhere between $750 and $30,000 per CD. If they were willful, MP3.com would be liable for as much as $150,000 per CD. (MP3.com ultimately copied about 80,000 CDs onto its servers, but the parties have not yet determined what fraction came from Universal, the world's largest record group.)'The story of this lawsuit is already fascinating, and it hasn't even started yet!'Although MP3.com had told the Recording Industry Association of America nothing of its plans [to rip 40,000 CDs and store them on their servers] until then – so as not to tip off its business strategy to major labels or potential digital-music competitors – the company instantly invited the RIAA to inspect its premises to see what it was doing, with the hope, it maintains, of persuading the RIAA that its service was legal and harmless. 'RIAA representatives, including the organization's chief litigation counsel Steven Fabrizio and outside counsel Hadrian Katz, who is now Universal's lead trial counsel, took MP3.com up on its offer on Jan. 18. Three days later, the RIAA sued.'


Permalink
Aug 29, 2000

Home-spying software prompts investigation
Privacy from Companies8/29/2000; 10:49:56 AM 'The Florida Attorney General's office, in a civil investigation, is looking into whether a Vero Beach, Fla. company, SpectorSoft, is violating the law with its home-spying software....'SpectorSoft lets its installer monitor everything a person looks at on a computer screen, in a series of rapid snapshots....'But could such private surveillance be illegal? ''We are investigating and researching in an effort to determine if some of the software being manufactured by that company might violate Florida law,'' Assistant State Attorney General Stephen A. LeClair said.'


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